Dating apps like Tinder are making more women freeze their eggs

Dating apps like Tinder are making more women freeze their eggs because they encourage men not to settle down, academic claims

  • Platforms offer men so much choice that they can date younger women 
  • Women of the same age are being left without suitable partners 
  • Women who freeze their eggs when younger may have a better chance of becoming pregnant later if they use them for IVF
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Dating apps are causing women to freeze their eggs because men who use them do not want to settle down, an expert claims.

Platforms such as Tinder offer men so much choice that they can date younger women and put off starting a family, academic Dr Kylie Baldwin said.

Women of the same age are left without suitable partners and are freezing their eggs to avoid running out of time to be mothers.


The increased use of dating apps means that women are struggling to find partners the same age as them 

Dr Baldwin, a medical sociologist at De Montfort University in Leicester, said the rise of dating apps may explain why egg freezing rates have more than quadrupled since 2010 – despite the procedure costing up to £8,200.

At a conference run by fertility charity the Progress Educational Trust in London, she said: ‘The digital revolution of the modern day has allowed individuals to connect with multiple partners with increasing ease.’

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Dr Baldwin said dating apps can lead to ‘short-term, disposable partners’, adding that men who date online may be more likely to put off having children.

Women who freeze their eggs when younger may have a better chance of becoming pregnant later if they use them for IVF.


Women who freeze their eggs earlier could have a better chance of becoming pregnant through IVF (above)

HOW DOES IVF WORK?

In-vitro fertilisation, known as IVF, is a medical procedure in which a woman has an already-fertilised egg inserted into her womb to become pregnant.

It is used when couples are unable to conceive naturally, and a sperm and egg are removed from their bodies and combined in a laboratory before the embryo is inserted into the woman.

Once the embryo is in the womb, the pregnancy should continue as normal.

The procedure can be done using eggs and sperm from a couple or those from donors. 

Guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends that IVF should be offered on the NHS to women under 43 who have been trying to conceive through regular unprotected sex for two years.

People can also pay for IVF privately, which costs an average of £3,348 for a single cycle, according to figures published in January 2018, and there is no guarantee of success.

The NHS says success rates for women under 35 are about 29 per cent, with the chance of a successful cycle reducing as they age.

Around eight million babies are thought to have been born due to IVF since the first ever case, British woman Louise Brown, was born in 1978.

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